z
zeldathemes

Hahaha E. Royston Pike literally called Viscount Goderich a “nonentity” in his book Britain’s Prime Ministers from Walpole to Wilson (1968).

4 hours ago on October 21st | J | 1 note

Dammit now I don’t dare to go back any further on my blog. I will DIE OF MORTIFICATION if I find out that I made a pro-monarchist or pro-Thatcher post. (I KNOW AT LEAST ONE EXISTS.)

13 hours ago on October 21st | J | 0 notes

Going through my archive again and EWWWW I can’t believe that I liked Dizzy and the Tory clown-car brigade 2 years ago. I must have had a Conservative Teenager phase back when I was 13-ish because while tidying my room a few days ago I discovered a pile of papers covered with unusually flowery language… and upon closer inspection JESUS CHIRST I COPIED OUT TWO WHOLE CHAPTERS OF DIZ’S SYBIL BY HAND?????  

13 hours ago on October 21st | J | 1 note

isabelasbooty:

i fucking love renaissance art like i saw this piece today that depicted the virgin’s immaculate conception as a tiny jesus flying in through a window on a collision course with mary’s hoo ha like

image

image

image

LOOK AT HIM GO

14 hours ago on October 21st | J | 26,363 notes
Tagged as: #art 
scorpiondagger:

check out the scorpion dagger augmented reality book!

scorpiondagger:

check out the scorpion dagger augmented reality book!

14 hours ago on October 21st | J | 6,680 notes
Tagged as: #art #best 

historical-hipster:

Here ones that I thought up for Robespierre ↓

Robespierre sits down:
RobespCHAIR

Robespierre goes bald:
RobespNOMOREHAIR

Robespierre gets a new outfit:
RobesGOTFLAIR

Robespierre takes shirt off:
RobespITGOTHOTINHERE

Robespierre’s nudes leak:
RobespBARE

Robespierre is a good sport:
RobespFAIR

Robespierre is kind:
RobespCARE

Robespierre doesn’t blink:
RobespSTARE

Robespierre goes missing:
RobespISNTTHERE

Robespierre is one of a kind:
RobespRARE

Robespierre own bunnies:
RobespHARE

Robespierre works with a partner: RobespiPAIR

Robespierre bets one of his friends:
RobespDARE

Robespierre shaves his legs
RobespNAIR

14 hours ago on October 21st | J | 51 notes

stimutax:

70 Most Useful Sites on the Internet

14 hours ago on October 21st | J | 20,257 notes
Tagged as: #useful 

Love and respect Woman. Seek in her not merely a comfort, but a force, an inspiration, the redoubling of your intellectual and moral faculties. Cancel from your minds every idea of superiority over Woman. You have none whatsoever. Long prejudice, an inferior education, and a perennial legal inequality and injustice, have I created that apparent intellectual inferiority I which has been converted into an argument of continued oppression.

But does not the history of every oppression teach us how the oppressor ever seeks his justification and support by appealing to a fact of his own creation? The feudal castes that withheld education from you, the sons of the people, excluded you on the grounds of that very want of education from the rights of the citizen, from the sanctuary wherein Laws are framed, and from that right of vote which is the initiation of your social mission.

The Slaveholders of America declare the black race radically inferior and incapable of education, and yet persecute those who seek to instruct them.

For half a century the supporters of the reigning families in Italy have declared the Italians unfit for freedom, and meanwhile, by their laws, and by the brute force of hireling armies, they close every path through which we might overcome the obstacles to our improvement, did they really exist, as if tyranny could ever be a means of educating men for liberty.

Now, we men have ever been and still are guilty of a similar crime towards Woman. Avoid even the shadow or semblance of this crime : there is none heavier in the sight of God, for it divides the human family into two classes, and imposes or accepts the subjugation of one class to the other.

In the sight of God the Father there is neither Man nor Woman. There is only the Human Being, that Being in whom — whether the form be of male or female — those characteristics which distinguish Humanity from the brute creation ) are united, namely, the social tendency and the capacity of education and progress.

Wheresoever these characteristics exist, the Human nature is revealed, and thence perfect : equality both of rights and of duties. Like two distinct branches springing from the same trunk, man and woman are varieties springing from the common basis — Humanity. There is no inequality between them, but — even as is often the case among men — diversity of tendency and of special vocation […]

Man and Woman — even as these two peoples —fulfil different functions in Humanity, but these functions are equally sacred, equally manifestations of that Thought of God which He has made the soul of the universe.

Consider Woman therefore as the partner and companion, not merely of your joys and sorrows, but of your thoughts, your aspirations, your studies, and your endeavours after social amelioration. Consider her your Equal in your civil and political life. Be ye the two human wings that lift the soul towards the Ideal we are destined to attain.

The Mosaic Bible has declared: God created Man, and Woman from Man, but your Bible, the Bible of the Future, will proclaim, that God created Humanity, made manifest in the Woman and the Man.

Giuseppe Mazzini establishing the inherent equality of the sexes in On the Duties of Man (x).

———————————

I don’t know whether to be amused or appalled that Mazzini managed to imbue the Christian God with so many republican virtues that are clearly absent from descriptions of Him in the Scriptures — not that he appears to have cared about the literal meaning of the Scriptures or assigned much value to them, since he proposes a “Bible of the Future” which could just as well be a secular republican constitution. Indeed, Mazzini’s God (he dedicated the whole of Chapter 2 to expounding his vision of the divine) doesn’t resemble the god of any known religion, and instead aligns more consistently with our modern secular ideals of liberty, equality, justice, and inalienable rights. But while secular republicanism considers these ideals as instrumentally good — that is good for achieving and protecting the republican conception of liberty, defined primarily as freedom from domination (Viroli, 2002) — Mazzini’s religious republicanism treats these ideals as inherently good; fundamental truths given by God through revelation. 

15 hours ago on October 21st | J | 1 note

Marx is such a hater ugh. Mazzini is a saint; he supported women’s suffrage — and universal suffrage — long before it was fashionable, not merely out of religious conviction (which he possessed in no small amount), but also out of republicanism 

My dear friend, can you doubt me? Can you doubt my watching from afar with an eager eye and a blessing soul, the efforts of brave and earnest British women struggling for the extension of the Suffrage to their sex, or for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts, which is only an
incident in the general question – Equality between Man and Woman – sacred for any sensible, logical and fearless man who fights for any question involving Equality to whatever class or section of mankind it applies?

— Letter to Emile, c.1870

What have your monarchs ever done besides pinching from the public purse and oppressing the very people who make the existence of a public purse possible?

17 hours ago on October 21st | J | 0 notes
cheatsheet:

Choose your own aventure!

cheatsheet:

Choose your own aventure!

17 hours ago on October 21st | J | 47,332 notes

Tony Benn at the Right to Work March in 1981.

17 hours ago on October 21st | J | 99 notes

lilcabinet:

George Osborne: Most Influential Londoner

1 day ago on October 20th | J | 51 notes

My school library owns only two books on British politics that aren’t biographies of Thatcher or Churchill, and both are older than my Mom ._. 

1 day ago on October 20th | J | 2 notes
Peel was the heir to a vast cotton-spinning fortune (Hurd tells us he was worth £22 million in modern terms), and he built himself a luxurious but over-the-top country mansion at Drayton Manor in Staffordshire. (It was demolished when the family ran out of money and is now a theme park.) Peel never rid himself of his northern accent. The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife.

"Can he really have been that flawless?", a review of Douglas Hurd’s Robert Peel: A Biography| The Telegraph

——

"The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife." Oh Peel. Now I see where the Duke of Wellington was coming from when he said "I have no small talk, and Peel has no manners. ” 

(via theironduchess)

Disraeli used to send up Peel’s accent, in particular how he would “poot” a question and say “woonderful” instead of “wonderful”.  Peel’s family background may not have been genteel but as AN Wilson points out in The Victorians, accent snobbery and insistence on received pronunciation were largely mid-nineteenth century innovations.  In earlier decades it wasn’t unusual for upper class people to speak with regional accents. 

(via velvethatlady)

Diz was a total accent snob (he made fun of Gladstone’s accent too!) which is weird bc his own accent was apparently obnoxiously fussy—the only references I can find to it are reports that he managed to fit 3 syllables into business & 4 into parliament. D made some comment somewhere about the 15th Earl of Derby’s ‘Lancashire patois’…and Derby was one of his only friends! (To say nothing of the fact that, accent or not, Derby was certainly of a much higher social class than the faux-aristocrat mocking his speech…) though I think the oddest accent story is the fact that Lord John Russell apparently had a VERY archaic accent & pronounced cucumber ‘cowcumber’.

Basically I want to go back in time with a tape recorder and hear how people actually spoke in the 1840s.

(via hollenius)

Diz apparently talked in The Queen’s English (LOL!) except for his tendencies to pronounce business as bus-i-ness and parliament as par-l-i-ament (how even?). Gladstone’s boyhood in Liverpool, in the days before “scouse” had developed, lent to his speech a “Lancastrian burr" that allowed his critics to stress he was no gentlemen (x). Peel too had a distinct northern accent (either Lancashire or Stratffordshire) and reversed the vowel sounds of Received Pronunication’s put (“putt”) and the first syllable of wonderful (“woonderful”) and had trouble with h’s. (Does Accent Matter?, p. 24)

Lord John Russell’s accent sounds like the “Cavendish Drawl”, also known as the “Devonshire House accent” after the Duke of Devonshire’s family whence it originated. The glamorous Whig hostess Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire, made the accent popular among the foppish young aristocrats who formed the Devonshire House circle, many of whom later entered Parliament as Whigs and became Liberals in the Victorian era. Cavendish influence in the Whig Party meant that many of those who sought to ingratiate themselves with the party affected the drawl as well, including the future Lord Melbourne, Queen Victoria’s beloved Prime Minister. Once, when asked if she was certain Melbourne was a true Whig, Queen Victoria replied that he must be because he pronounced “Rome as ‘room’ and gold as ‘goold’”.

Historian Amanda Foreman, in her biography of the Duchess, describes the Drawl as being “characterised as part baby-talk, part refined affection: hope was written and pronounced as ‘whop’; you became ‘oo’. Vowels were compressed and extended so that cucumber became ‘cowcumber’ yellow ‘yaller’, gold ‘goold’, and spoil rhymed with mile. Stresses fell on unexpected syllables, such as bal-cony instead of bal-cony and con-template. By the middle of the next century all Whigs would speak in the Drawl, transforming a family tradition into a symbol of political allegiance. ”

Leslie Mitchell gives a more extensive account in his book The Whig World: “They [the Whigs and Devonshire acolytes in general] pronounced English words is ways that set them apart: ‘Gold was goold, lilac laylock, bracelet brasslet, yellow was ialo or yaller, china cheyney, balcony bal-cony, sovereign suvereign, envelope was pronounced as in French, the h was dropped in hotel. Coffee was inexorably cawfee, governess was governess (the o as in of); a carriage was quite often a chariot.’ Even a change of politics brought no change in accent. When the French Revolution frightened Walter Spencer Stanhope into Pittism, he continued to pronounce London Lunnon, cucumber cowcumber and woman ’oman. Oddly enough, the contemporary pronunciation of Derby is the last example of Whig influence on language.”

1 day ago on October 20th | J | 15 notes
Peel was the heir to a vast cotton-spinning fortune (Hurd tells us he was worth £22 million in modern terms), and he built himself a luxurious but over-the-top country mansion at Drayton Manor in Staffordshire. (It was demolished when the family ran out of money and is now a theme park.) Peel never rid himself of his northern accent. The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife.

"Can he really have been that flawless?", a review of Douglas Hurd’s Robert Peel: A Biography| The Telegraph

——

"The waspish diarist Charles Greville thought he looked like a fat shopkeeper, and noticed him greedily stuffing himself and cutting creams and jellies with a knife." Oh Peel. Now I see where the Duke of Wellington was coming from when he said "I have no small talk, and Peel has no manners. ” 

(via theironduchess)

Somewhere I’ve got a whole page of quotes from Hurd’s book written out longhand where people are talking about how awkward Peel is. Hurd’s pretty easy on him though, I’ve seen other biographies that spend page after page quoting Peel’s contemporaries describing his icy aloofness. (The fact that Wellington calls him ‘crotchety’ is pretty telling—probably the only instance I can think of an older man applying the epithet to a younger one.)

of course the best part of Douglas Hurd’s book is he spends a page and a half talking about how Robert Peel reminds him of EDWARD HEATH—just a few weeks ago, I was reading something else where Gladstone was describing Peel’s sulkiness, so now I’m not going to be able to think of him as anything other than a 19th century Ted (except less toothy & more ginger). I guess this makes the Corn Laws the era’s equivalent to the EEC? Probably best not to push that analogy too far, though both broke Conservative party bases—the difference is that the effect was delayed with Europe, the initial opposition coming from the left of Labour until it was later overtaken by the future UKIPers

(via hollenius)

What a coincidence! I once copied out half a page of Hurd’s book to make a Wellington post (here). That Heath reference did strike me as particularly weird when I was skimming through Hurd’s book in the bookshop (ughhh it costs 2 weeks worth of pocket money), and it did not help that Hurd spent pages comparing the Tories under Peel to the modern Conservative Party. Oh God if we bring that analogy to its logical conclusion… Disraeli = MARGARET THATCHER??!

1 day ago on October 20th | J | 15 notes